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SIJ

SIJ.

 

SIJ is the abbreviation for sacroiliac joint. The first problem with the sacroiliac joint is that it is out of reach of both manipulation as well as imaging. “The SIJ is particularly inaccessible due to its depth within the pelvis and the surrounding musculature, making it impossible to palpate the joint externally.” (L. M. Goff, 2008). The second problem is that the sacroiliac joint is subject to very minuscule range of motion. For instance, measurements effectuated on the sagittal plane have found that the range of motion of the SIJ was less than 1°. In fact all the SI damages observed on horses affected with sacroiliac dysfunction are all due to excessive movement and therefore instability of the joint. Stability is the main issue and consequently, all therapies attempting to release muscles, tendons and fascia involved in the stability of the sacroiliac joint are likely to create sacroiliac dysfunction instead of treating the problem. The third problem is that palpations are extremely problematic. The SI joint itself is out of reach and the only palpation that can be made is on the dorsal sacroiliac ligament (DSIL), which is greatly involved in the stability of the SIJ. However, if it might be possible to access the DSIL on a skinny horse, the mass of the gluteal muscles renders any manipulation quite difficult on a horse properly muscled up.

 

There is a battery of tests and manipulations that have been proposed for horses based on manipulations applied to humans. However, while a human is likely to participate in the manipulation knowing that some pain during manipulation might lead to better reeducation in the future, the horse, which lives in the moment, is more likely to protect himself from any stimulation of pain, resisting the movement that the therapy is suggesting. Therefore, even if some movement might have some therapeutic effect, their application through manual manipulation is unlikely to occur. Instead, therapeutic movements can be created riding the horse or working the horse in hand through the technique proper to the science of motion.

 

The most important concept relative to SI injury is that the main problem is about lack of stability. Instability is either caused by incorrect work of the muscles and tendons and ligaments associated with the joint or due to pathologic changes within the joint. In fact, pathologic changes are the more advanced level of a problem that started with poor or inappropriate muscular work. The therapy is therefore about recreating stability of the whole system. This is the topic of our Sacroiliac Day which is Friday February 17th, 2012 starting at 10am.

Jean Luc Cornille

 

Immersion Program

Immersion Program.

 

Chazot Thoughts

Chazot Thoughts
IV
Jean Luc Cornille

“Science allows us to look at natural processes with a different eye and to understand how things work, (Marc Kaufman)

Tonight I came back from my training session feeling simultaneously good and tired. I held my neck outside of my stall, but I was not really looking outside. I was looking inside myself thinking about my body. Manchester asked, hard work? I told him not really; we stayed at the walk the entire training session. Manchester immediately asked; something wrong? Usually he does that when he wants you to work very specific muscles groups. I confessed that yesterday, as I was rolling energetically in the sand I overdid and I did not feel very comfortable for the rest of the day. That evening I was glad that he did not ask too much. We started at the trot and he noticed that when he was changing the diagonal of his rising trot, I protected myself for a few strides. I don’t think that I was lame but I was cautious. He walked, let me rest and asked for a few longitudinal and lateral flexions. He then stopped thinking you hurt yourself again. His mind was on a quote that he feels does fit me very well. “Experience enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again.” (Franklin P. Jones)

Manchester added, as if he could read my mind, and today you did the whole training session at the walk. And tonight you feel like your whole body has been worked intensively. I wondered how he knew all that but then he told me. When I first started my reeducation, I stayed two months at the walk. I had been submitted to numerous therapies but once set in motion I did what we are all doing instinctively, I protected my problem. I sheltered my left stifle extending my left hind limb without using my knee extensors. I have done that since day one and this is why not one of the previous approaches ever reached my problem. My protective reflex mechanism did not fool him. He knows that we can execute exactly the same movement using different muscle groups. In fact, talking about my left stifle I can feel that he was thinking about a study that he had read earlier on. He had a sentence in his mind. If I remember right, it was something like, “A visually identical hind limb extension in late stance may be accomplished by only hip extensor muscles, only knee extensor muscles or any combination of these.” (Liduin S. Meershoek and Anton J. van den Bogert. Mechanical Analysis of Locomotion.) I guess, late stance means the end of the support phase since it is the moment where we are using these muscles. He played with my balance, slightly changed my body posture. He focused on the longitudinal flexion of my spine and I realized then that I was using my knee extensors. I stop immediately thinking, this is going to hurt, but it did not hurt, so I tried again. Little by little, my muscles became stronger and when he asked for the trot I was not too worried about it. He did not really ask me any specific movement. He does not think that repeating a movement can educate our body. He is right about that. For years I executed many movements without ever using my knee extensors muscles on the left side. My riders were focusing on neck posture and other details and meanwhile, I was executing the move protecting my problem.

Well, this whole story looks very much like what we did today and I reacted like Manchester, I halted when I was worried about the pain. Each time, he waited a few minutes and asked me to move forward into slightly different body coordination. I could not tell him exactly where I was uncomfortable because this was not very clear to me. When I realized that he was not disturbed by me stopping, I used it as an indication. I think this was helpful. He was listening to my body language trying a different coordination or nuance. He created lateral flexion to the left and then to the right changing the longitudinal flexion of my spine each time I was becoming a little tense. At one moment, I felt quite comfortable. I guess I was clear in my reaction because he recreated over and over the same coordination.
It was a lot of concentration and I halted because I was mentally tired. He dismounted, checked my back on the right side behind the saddle thinking same tomorrow, may be one more day after and you should be OK. On the way home, he was thinking about a study recently published form Australia, animals can only learn actively, not passively. This is so true. We do not keep in motion the benefices of static therapies. Instinctively we return to familiar patterns. We do not naturally work a problem but rather we naturally protect it. If no one guides our brain toward a body coordination that makes us work the right muscles, we cannot do that by our own.

By the way, I was reading his last article. The funny thing is that he writes with a French accent.
Chazot
Jean Luc Cornille

Chazot

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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“The Making of Chazot” – a review – Horses

“The Making of Chazot” – a review – Horses.

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

Working With Navicular Syndrome

Working With Navicular Syndrome.

 

Quolibet Z Part 2

Quolibet Z Part 2.

 
 

Equine Professional Speaker Lecturer For Hire

Equine Professional Speaker Lecturer For Hire.

 
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Posted by on November 18, 2010 in Equine, horse news

 

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YouTube – Thinking

YouTube – Thinking.

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2010 in chazot, dressage, Equine, horse training

 

The Making Of Chazot DVD

The Making Of Chazot DVD.

 
 

Jean Luc Cornille discoveries of the horses spine and the influence on training horses.

Jean Luc Cornille discoveries of the horses spine and the influence on traning horses..